[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="6 Reasons to Invest in Professional Duct Cleaning" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text] The buildup of dust, mold, and other allergens in your home’s ductwork can have an effect on your family’s health and the health of your heating and cooling systems. Removing contaminants from your HVAC system will greatly reduce these effects and lead to cleaner air in your home, among other benefits. Here are our top 6 reasons to invest in regular professional duct cleaning.   1 - Allergies Bacteria, mold, fungi, and other allergens can grow in the tight spaces of your air ducts. Pet fur, dander, dust, and dust mites can also build up in your system. Since the air in your home is circulated through your air ducts several times a day, this buildup can aggravate allergy symptoms. Regular duct cleaning can provide significant relief to family members with allergies. 2 - Mold Since most HVAC systems are located in the basement of the home where moisture levels are highest, it’s likely for mold to be present in your air ducts. The likelihood is even higher if your basement has been damp, flooded, or otherwise water damaged in the past. 3 - Dust When you dust your home, but find that it’s dusty again within a few days, that could be an indication that your ducts need to be cleaned. Regular professional duct cleaning will result in your home staying dust-free for longer periods of time. 4 - Odors Dust in your air ducts collects the smells of food, smoke, cleaning products, pets, and more. As your HVAC system circulates the air through your home throughout the day, all of your home’s odors will circulate as well. Clean duct work means fresher-smelling air. 5 - Pest Infestation There are many reasons to avoid a pest infestation in your ductwork, not the least of which being that insects and rodents leave droppings and other materials that harm the air quality in your home. Pests love dirty ductwork - keeping your system clean will discourage them from gathering there. 6 - Efficiency The buildup of dirt and debris in your ductwork can hinder your HVAC system’s airflow, causing it to work harder to keep your home at a comfortable temperature. This excess strain can lead to higher energy bills, as well as more frequent repairs and a shorter lifespan for your system. Having your ductwork regularly inspected and serviced will result in cleaner air circulating through your home and a more efficient, longer-lasting HVAC system.   Find more information on Titan Heating & Cooling air duct cleaning services here, and give us a call to schedule your next cleaning - 651.714.8931. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Spring Maintenance Tips To Protect Your Homes Value" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text] If the thought of spring cleaning makes you long for winter, it’s time to think about these annual chores in a new way. By dedicating just a few days to complete these simple tasks, you will keep your home running smoothly and protect your investment at the same time.   Inside your home • As the weather gets warmer, it’s important to ensure your windows are in good working condition. Inspect all windows for proper operation and a tight fit. Clean the window tracks and check that the weatherstripping hasn’t cracked or torn. Preventing unwanted outside air from leaking into your home also will reduce your energy bills. • Remember, open windows can be hazardous, especially to young children. Screens are designed to keep insects from getting into a home, not to prevent a child from falling. Parents need to take action to reduce the potential risks of accidental falls from windows. • Have your air conditioning system inspected and cleaned. If your system has a filter, replace it every three months to keep your unit working efficiently. • Warmer weather also means that pests — including ants, roaches, rats, and termites — will be looking to join your household. Keep them out by sealing cracks and openings along baseboards, behind sinks and around pipes and windows. And, repair holes in door and window screens.   Outside your home • Check the condition of glazing compound, caulking and exterior paint. Replace or paint as needed. • Exchange glass and screens in storm doors and/or windows. Ensure the screens are clean by washing gently with soapy water. • Inspect your roof for snow damage. • To prevent outside pests from entering your home, look for cracks and holes on the outside of your home and seal them up. Be sure to include points where utility lines enter the house. Also address damage to the basement foundation and windows. • Check for evidence of termites such as sagging floors and ceilings or dry, brown tunnels in the ground near the home’s foundation. • Seed and feed the lawn and plant annuals, cut back perennials that need pre-growth pruning. • Clean your gutters of debris. Yes, you have to do this in the fall and the spring. Long winters bring a mix of storms and heavy winds that can carry a lot of debris to your gutters.   Remember, focusing on these small jobs now will save you time and money in the future. For more information about home maintenance, contact the Home Builders Association of Middle Tennessee (HBAMT) online at www.hbamt.org, or visit the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) at www.nahb.org/forconsumers.   Trey Lewis is president of the Home Builders Association of Middle Tennessee. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Titan Heating And Cooling Tips" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text] Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home — typically making up about 48% of your utility bill.   No matter what kind of heating and cooling system you have in your house, you can save money and increase your comfort by properly maintaining and upgrading your equipment. But remember, an energy-efficient furnace alone will not have as great an impact on your energy bills as using the whole-house approach. By combining proper equipment maintenance and upgrades with recommended insulation, air sealing, and thermostat settings, you can save about 30% on your energy bill while reducing environmental emissions.   HEATING AND COOLING TIPS Set your programmable thermostat as low as is comfortable in the winter and as high as is comfortable in the summer, and — depending on the season — raise or lower the setpoint when you’re sleeping or away from home.   Clean or replace filters on furnaces and air conditioners once a month or as recommended.   Clean warm-air registers, baseboard heaters, and radiators as needed; make sure they’re not blocked by furniture, carpeting, or drapes.   Eliminate trapped air from hot-water radiators once or twice a season; if unsure about how to perform this task, contact a professional.   Place heat-resistant radiator reflectors between exterior walls and the radiators.   Turn off kitchen, bath, and other exhaust fans within 20 minutes after you are done cooking or bathing; when replacing exhaust fans, consider installing high-efficiency, low-noise models.   During winter, keep the draperies and shades on your south-facing windows open during the day to allow the sunlight to enter your home and closed at night to reduce the chill you may feel from cold windows. During summer, keep the window coverings closed during the day to block the sun’s heat.   LONG-TERM SAVINGS TIPS Select energy-efficient products when you buy new heating and cooling equipment. Your contractor should be able to give you energy fact sheets for different types, models, and designs to help you compare energy usage.   For furnaces, look for high Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) ratings. The national minimum is 78% AFUE, but there are ENERGY STAR® models on the market that exceed 90% AFUE. For air conditioners, look for a high Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER). The current minimum is 13 SEER for central air conditioners. ENERGY STAR models are 14.5 SEER or more. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Tips: Air Conditioners" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text] Buying a bigger room air conditioner won’t necessarily make you feel more comfortable during the hot summer months. In fact, a room air conditioner that’s too big for the area it is supposed to cool will perform less efficiently and less effectively than a smaller, properly sized unit. The reason: an oversized unit will cool the room(s) to the thermostat set-point before proper dehumidification occurs, making the area feel “clammy” and uncomfortable. Central air-conditioning systems need to be sized by professionals. Explore our Energy Saver 101 infographic on home cooling to learn how an air conditioner works.   If you have a central air system in your home, set the fan to shut off at the same time as the compressor, which is usually done by setting the “auto” mode on the fan setting. In other words, don’t use the system’s central fan to provide air circulation — use circulating fans in individual rooms.   Instead of air-conditioning, consider installing a whole-house fan. Whole-house fans work in many climates and help cool your home by pulling cool air through the house and exhausting warm air through the attic. Use the fan most effectively to cool down your house during cooler times of the day: your home will stay cooler through the hotter times of the day without using the fan.   COOLING TIPS • Set your thermostat at as high a temperature as comfortably possible in the summer, and ensure humidity control if needed. The smaller the difference between the indoor and outdoor temperatures, the lower your overall cooling bill will be. • Avoid setting your thermostat at a colder setting than normal when you turn on your air conditioner. It will not cool your home any faster and could result in excessive cooling and, therefore, unnecessary expense. • Consider using an interior fan along with your window air conditioner to spread the cooled air through your home without greatly increasing your power use. • Avoid placing appliances that give off heat such as lamps or TVs near a thermostat.   LONG-TERM SAVINGS TIPS • If your air conditioner is old, consider buying an energy-efficient model. Look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels — qualified room air conditioners are 10% more efficient, and qualified central units are about 15% more efficient than standard models. • Consider installing a whole-house fan or evaporative cooler if appropriate for your climate. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Duct Cleaning & Dryer Vent Cleaning" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text] Duct Cleaning and Dryer Vent Cleaning – Titan Heating and Cooling is your most competitive source for Duct Cleaning and Dryer Vent Cleaning! This service pays for itself with immediately improved energy efficiency! [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Check This Before Calling For Air Conditioner Service" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text] Titan Heating and Cooling is your most competitive source for Duct Cleaning and Dryer Vent Cleaning! This video shows you some things you can check before calling your air conditioning repair company. [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_video link="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PO8GBe-TEWo&feature=emb_logo " el_width="70" align="center"][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Four Best Days Of Summer Are Back!" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text]MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The four best days of summer? That’s the new plan announced Friday for the Aquatennial.   Big changes have been made to the Minneapolis festival. Instead of 10 days, it will now run for four, and some of the Aquatennial’s most popular beach events have been cut.   In a way, the weather fit the mood on Lake Calhoun Friday when news broke that its banks won’t host a Minneapolis favorite.   In the London house, it was especially hard for some of last year’s sandcastle winners to hear the competition won’t be back.   “It’s a big disappointment,” Annique London said. “We had a ton of fun, learned a lot about building sandcastles and ended up taking third place in our category.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="How To Install A Mini-Split Air Conditioner" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text]In this video, This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey explains how the pros retrofit a compact cooling unit.   Steps: 1. Turn off the electricity to the circuit. 2. Hold mounting bracket to the wall, level it, then mark the screw hole locations and where to bore a hole for the refrigeration lines, condensate discharge line and electrical cable. 3. From inside, bore hole into the block wall with rotary hammer and 3-inch-diameter masonry coring bit. Once the bit’s pilot penetrates the wall, finish boring the hole from the outside. 4. Screw the mounting bracket to the wall, making sure it’s level. 5. Install the air-conditioning unit to the wall-mounted bracket. Pass the refrigeration lines and condensate discharge line through the hole in the wall. 6. Attach a vertical chase directly below the hole in the exterior wall; the chase will house the refrigeration lines, condensate discharge line and electrical cable. 7. Extend the condensate discharge line down to within a few inches of the ground by attaching a length of PVC pipe. Secure the discharge line to the pipe with duct tape. Fasten the lower portion of the pipe to the chase by screwing on a metal C-clamp. 8. Carefully bend the copper refrigeration lines down into the chase. Use two adjustable wrenches to remove the compression fittings from the ends of the copper lines. 9. Slide a brass nut onto a new length of copper tubing, then use flaring tool to flare the end of the copper tubing. 10. Hold the tubing’s flared end against the end of the refrigeration line coming from the air conditioner. Hand-tighten the nut to hold the copper tubing to the refrigeration line. Repeat to attach the remaining refrigerant line. 11. Set the outdoor condensing unit onto a level pad adjacent to the chase. 12. Use two adjustable wrenches to tighten the compression fittings on the refrigerant lines. Then wrap pipe insulation around each line. 13. Run weather-tight conduit from an outdoor electrical box to the condenser unit. Feed electrical wires through the conduit. 14. Run a length of nonmetallic electrical cable from the condenser unit through the hole in the wall to the indoor air conditioning unit. 15. Snap the cover onto the chase to conceal and protect the lines and cable. 16. Make all electrical connections at condenser and at air conditioner, then pressure test the system with nitrogen to 300 pounds per square inch. 17. Vacuum out the nitrogen, then open valves to release refrigerant into the system. 18. Turn on the electricity and test the air conditioner.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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[vc_row][vc_column][qodef_custom_font font_family="Archivo" font_size="60px" line_height="70px" font_weight="700" text_align="left" content_custom_font="Solving The Energy Efficiency Quandary" color="#000000"][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text]New research showing dismal results for energy efficiency in homes highlights the need for performance-based measures. By Richard Martin on July 8, 2015   WHY IT MATTERS Energy efficiency has long been viewed as the most cost-effective way to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.   American industries have done a good job of becoming more efficient. According to a new report from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, the energy intensity of the U.S. economy (measured in BTUs consumed per dollar of GDP) has roughly halved since 1980. Energy use in the United States rose by 26 percent from 1980 to 2014, according to the group—a period when the U.S. GDP went up 149 percent.   Making homes more energy efficient has proved more difficult—and harder to measure. While the energy intensity of the residential sector has gone down slightly in recent years, the increase in average house size (along with greater use of home electronics) has meant that overall energy consumption by households has continued to rise, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That has fueled a search for more effective residential efficiency programs—and intensified the debate over their benefits relative to their costs.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

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